Boekgegevens
Titel: Nieuwe leerwijze der Engelsche taal
Deel: Tweede cursus
Auteur: Gerdes, E.
Uitgave: Amsterdam: P.N. van Kampen, 1856
Auteursrechten: Zie auteursrechten
Citeerinstructie: Bijzondere Collecties van de Universiteit van Amsterdam, UBM: P.B. 580 : 1e dr. (dl. II)
URL: https://schoolmuseum.uba.uva.nl/bookid/LCSM_205055
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Glamis and Cawdor. And Macbeth had a wife, who was
a very ambitious wicked woman, and when she found out
that her husband thought of raising himself up to be king
of Scotland, she encouraged him by all means in her pow-
er , and persuaded him that the only way to get pos-
session of the crown was to kill the good old King Dun-
can. Macbeth was very unwilling to commit so great a
crime, for he. knew what a good king Duncan had been,
and he recollected how he was his relation, and had been
always very kind to him ; and had intrusted him with
the command of his army, and had bestowed on him the
government or thanedom of Cawdor. But his wife continued
telling him what a foolish cowardly thing it was in him
not to take the opportunity of making himself King, when
it was in his power to gain what the witches promised
him. So the wicked advice of his wife, and the prophecy
of these wretched old women, at last brought Macbeth to
think of murdering his King and his friend. The way in
which he accomplished his crime, made it still more
abominable.
Macbeth invited Duncan to come to visit him at a great
castle near Inverness; and the good King, who had no
suspicions of his kinsman, accepted the invitation very
willingly. Macbeth and his Lady received the King and
all his retinue with much appearance of joy, and made a
great feast, as a subject would do to make his king wel-
come. About the middle of the night, the King desired
to go to his apartment, and Macbeth conducted him to a
fine room, which had been prepared for him. Now, it
was the custom, in those barbarious times, that wherever
the King slept, two armed men slept in the same chamber,
in order to defend his person, in case he should be at-
tacked by any one during the night. But the wicked
Lady Macbeth had made these two watchmen drink a