Boekgegevens
Titel: First English reading book: Engelsch leesboek voor instituten, gymnasiën en hoogere burgerscholen: met Nederlandsche woordenlijst
Auteur: Herrig, Ludwig
Uitgave: Arnhem: J. Voltelen, 1869 *
Auteursrechten: Zie auteursrechten
Citeerinstructie: Bijzondere Collecties van de Universiteit van Amsterdam, UBM: IWO 513 H 21
URL: https://schoolmuseum.uba.uva.nl/bookid/LCSM_204683
Onderwerp: Taal- en letterkunde naar afzonderlijke talen: Engelse taalkunde
Trefwoord: Leesvaardigheid, Engels, Leermiddelen (vorm)
* jaar van uitgave niet op de gebruikelijke wijze verkregen, mogelijk betreft het een schatting
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   First English reading book: Engelsch leesboek voor instituten, gymnasiën en hoogere burgerscholen: met Nederlandsche woordenlijst
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I need not tell you to destroy it imme-
diately.'
Appleby sprang forward to receive the
scrawl; but ere he reached Pelham, he
threw his arms round Tresham's neck, and
sobbed out in great emotion — 'Pray for-
give me, dear James — pray do forgive
me.'
'Hurra! hurra!' shouted Vivian,'we shall
make a man of him yet.'
'I should be very, very glad that you
would make any thing of me,' said the
humbled boy, struggling with his tears;
'yes, any thing, so that you would not
laugh at me, and put 'Mister before my
name, and turn me into fun, and leave me
to myself.'
When, a year afterwards, he passed the
Midsummer vacation at Appleby Hall,
every one was alike struck by his improved
manners, and his increased alTcctions: and
they observed, with great truth, 'that
the acquisitions of his mind were at least
equalled by those of his heart.' They
were not previously aware, that vain con-
ceited children arc rarely of an amiable
and loving nature, because thier pride for-
bids the growth of gratitude in them, by
inspiring the belief that all kindness is
merely the proper tribute to their own
superiority.
So sensible was Appleby of the change
in himself, and the increased pleasure de-
rived from it, that he was never weary of
praising Mapleton House, and all connected
with it; but dearer, far dearer, than all
besides, was the kind Tresham, who had
rewarded good for evil.
H. H- THOU HAST LOST A FRIEND.
If thou hast lost a friend,
F>y hard or hasty word.
Go — call him to thy heart again;
Let pride no more be heard.
Hemind him of those happy days,
Too beautiful to last;
Ask, if a word should cancel years
Of truth and friendship past?
Oh! if thou'st lost a friend,
IJy hard or hasty word.
Go — call him to thy heart again;
Let pride no more be heard.
Oh! tell him, from thy thought
The light of joy has tied;
That, in thy sad and silent breast.
Thy lonely heart seems dead;
That mount and vale, — each path ye trod,
Ry morn or evening dim,
Reproach you with their frowning gaze.
And ask your soul for him.
Then, if thou'st lost a friend.
By hard or hasty word.
Go — call him to tliy heart again;
Let pride no more be heard.
(Charles Swain.)
i). 'BE KIND!'
lie kind to thy father — for when thou
wert young,
Who loved thee so fondly as he?
He caught the first accents that fell froiri
thy tongue,
And joined in thine innocent glee.
Be kind to thy father, for now he is old,
Ilis locks intermingled with grey.
His footsteps are feeble, once fearless and
bold;
Thy fathei' is passing away.
Be kind to thy mother — for lo on her
brow,
iMay traces of sorrow be seen;
0 well may'st thou cherish and comfort
her now,
For loving and kind hath she been.
Remember thy mother — for thee will
she pray,
As long as God giveth her breath,
With accents of kindness, then cheer her
lone way.
E'en to the dark valley of death.
Be kind to thy brother — his heart will
have dearth,
If the smile of thy love be withdrawn;
The tlowers of feeling will fade at theii
birth,
If the dew of affection be gone.
Be kind to thy brother — wherever you
are.
The love of a brother shall be
An ornament purer and richer by far.
Than pearl from the depths of the sea.
lie kind to thy sistei- — not many may
know
The depths of true sisterly love;
The wealth of the ocean lies fathoms below
The surface that sparkles above.
The kindness shall bring to thee many
sweet hours
And blessings thy patlnvay to crown;
Affection shall weave thee a garland of
llowers,
More precious than wealth or renown.