Boekgegevens
Titel: Nieuw Engelsch lees-, leer- en vertaalboek voor eerstbeginnenden
Auteur: Lagerwey, J.; Ludolph, L.J.C.
Uitgave: Gorinchem: J. Noorduyn en zoon, 1863
5e, verb. dr.
Auteursrechten: Zie auteursrechten
Citeerinstructie: Bijzondere Collecties van de Universiteit van Amsterdam, UBM: Obr. 5818
URL: https://schoolmuseum.uba.uva.nl/bookid/LCSM_201183
Onderwerp: Taal- en letterkunde naar afzonderlijke talen: Engelse taalkunde
Trefwoord: Engels, Leermiddelen (vorm)
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129.
able to discover it. We immediately came to Calais, and
finding your house on the spot indicated, took lodgings in
it. We were soon convinced that the treasure was buried
in the corner of your garden, but how dig for it without
being seen? We found a method; it was the construction
of the apartment. As soon as it was completed, we dug up
the earth and found our object in the chest, which we
have left you. We wish you success in your house, but
advise you to give better wine, and to be more moderate
in your prices."
Poor ])ulong was dumb with astonishment; he looked
nt iiis neighbour the grocer, and then at the empty chest;
they both shrugged up their shoulders, and acknowledged
that the English were not quite such fools as they had
taken them for.
Judge not tlie actions of any one, icithout knowing the
motives.
Vanity.
If there be any thing, which makes human nature appear
ridiculous to beings of superior faculties, it must be Pride.
They know so well the vanity of those imaginary perfections,
that swell the heart of man, and of those little accidental
advantages, whether in birth, fortune, or title, which
one man enjoys above another, that it must certainly
very much astonish, if it does not very much divert them,
when they see a mortal puffed up and valuing himself
above his neighbours on any of these accounts, at the
same time that he is obnoxious to all the common cala-
mities of the species.
To set this thought in its true light, we shall fancy, if
you please, that yonder mole-hill is inhabited by reason-
able creatures, and that every pismire (his shape and way
of life only excepted) is endowed with human passions.
How should we smile to hear one give us an account of