Boekgegevens
Titel: The history of Robinson Crusoe abridged: for the use of schools and private instruction
Auteur: [niet beschikbaar]
Uitgave: Amsterdam: G. Portielje and son, 1855
3e dr
Auteursrechten: Zie auteursrechten
Citeerinstructie: Bijzondere Collecties van de Universiteit van Amsterdam, UBM: Obr. 5559
URL: https://schoolmuseum.uba.uva.nl/bookid/LCSM_201063
Onderwerp: Taal- en letterkunde naar afzonderlijke talen: Engelse letterkunde
Trefwoord: Vertalingen (vorm)
Bekijk als:      
Scan: Afbeeldinggrootte:
   The history of Robinson Crusoe abridged: for the use of schools and private instruction
Vorige scan Volgende scanScanned page
01
t;aith trembled with the frightful claps of thunder.
"What would have become of us," said Robinson to
Friday: "if that weather had overtaken us at sea?"
While they were yet speaking they heard a signal
gun fired. Robinson immediately jumped up and uiade
a great fire on the top of a hill, to signify to those
who were in distress at sea that they could here find
a safe asylum. But the fire was hardly lighted, when
it was extinguished by a heavy shower of rain.
The storm did not abate before daybreak. Robin-
son and Friday instantly repaired to the seaside, to
discover whether he had heard aright or not. But
how great was their despair at seeing that the storm
had driven their canoe out to sea! They were quite
disconsolate when they perceived that it had disappear-
ed. Robinson looked keenly about, as far as he
could stretch his eyes, to see if he could not discover
some vessel, but he saw none. Sad and in despair
he went to the foot of a very high mountain, from
the summit of which he could see the eastern
coast: he climbed up in a hurry, and at length arri-
ved at the top, from whence he had a full view in
sea. Heavens! what joy did he feel, when he disco-
vered a ship, and, notwithstanding the distance,
plainly saw that she was a large one. He descended
in all haste and arrived out of breath at his dwelling,
laid hold of his arms, and gave himself no more time
to say any thing else to Friday, than: "They are
there! quickly! quickly!" Having said this, he ran
back again as swift as lightning.
XLIX LESSON.
From the confusion his master was in and the
haste he made, Friday imagined that the savages
had landed on the island. He therefore took his
arms and ran after him as fast as he could. They
had to go at least four miles before they arrived at