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Titel: The history of Robinson Crusoe abridged: for the use of schools and private instruction
Auteur: [niet beschikbaar]
Uitgave: Amsterdam: G. Portielje and son, 1855
3e dr
Auteursrechten: Zie auteursrechten
Citeerinstructie: Bijzondere Collecties van de Universiteit van Amsterdam, UBM: Obr. 5559
URL: https://schoolmuseum.uba.uva.nl/bookid/LCSM_201063
Onderwerp: Taal- en letterkunde naar afzonderlijke talen: Engelse letterkunde
Trefwoord: Vertalingen (vorm)
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34
Jake. Such a sudden and violent rain is called a rup-
ture of clouds.
XXX LESSON.
liohinson saved himself with much di£B.cult_y on a
tree, hut his poor lamas were carried away by the
violence of the stream. Their piteous bleating rent
his heart, and he would have endeavoured to save
their lives at the risk of his own if the swiftness of the
flood had not carried them already too far away. The
earthquake lasted some moments longer, after which
every thing became calm. All at once the wind fell,
and gradually the mouth of the hill ceased to cast
out fire. The sky grew serene and all the water ran
away in less than a quarter of an hour.
When Robinson descended from the tree on which
he had saved his life, his soul was so much dejected
by the accident which had happened, that he even
did not think to render thanks to the Being who had
saved his life in the most imminent danger. Indeed,
his situation was to the full as deplorable as it ever
had been. His cave was filled up and apparently
lost, and his dear lamas he had seen carried away
by the water. In all probality they had perished; all
his work was destroyed; all his fine schemes for the
future were frustrated. A prey to inquietude and an-
xiety, he leaned against the tree from which he
descended, and his lacerated heart vented itself in hea-
vy sighs. He remained inconsolable in this position
till daylireak.
<
XXXI LESSON.
Robinson, more dead than alive, went trembling
to his ruined habitation. But what tender emotions
did he feel when at the same moment his lamas
came skipping to meet him! He looked at them,