Boekgegevens
Titel: Engelsch leesboek voor eerstbeginnenden, benevens een woordenboekje
Auteur: Gedike, Friedrich
Uitgave: Deventer: J. de Lange, 1853
6e verb. dr
Opmerking: Vert. van: Englisches Lesebuch für Anfänger, nebst Wörterbuch und Sprachlehre. - 1795
Auteursrechten: Zie auteursrechten
Citeerinstructie: Bijzondere Collecties van de Universiteit van Amsterdam, UBM: Obr. 4089
URL: https://schoolmuseum.uba.uva.nl/bookid/LCSM_200629
Onderwerp: Taal- en letterkunde naar afzonderlijke talen: Engelse taalkunde
Trefwoord: Engels, Leermiddelen (vorm)
Bekijk als:      
Scan: Afbeeldinggrootte:
   Engelsch leesboek voor eerstbeginnenden, benevens een woordenboekje
Vorige scan Volgende scanScanned page
19
H. De fVolf en de Kraanvogel.
A wolf, after devouring; his prey, happened
to have a bone stick in his throat, which gave 1)
him so much pain, that he went 2) howling up
and down, and importuning every creature he
met, 3) to lend him a kind hand in order to
relieve him: nay, he promised a reasonable reward
to any one, that should i) undertake the opera-
tion with success. At last the crane, tempted
with the lucre of the reward, and having first
procured him to confirm his promise with an
oath, undertook 5) the business, and ventured
his long neck into the rapacious felon's throat.
In short, he plucked out the bone, and expected
the promised gratuity; when the wolf, turning
his eyes disdainfully towards him, said: »I did 6)
not think you had been so unconscionable. I had
your head in my mouth, and could have bit 7)
it off whenever I pleased, but suffered you to
take it away without any damage, and yet you
are not contented."
I) to give. 2) to go. 3) to meet. 4) shall. 5) to un-
dertake. 6) to do. 7) to bite.
■45. De Vos en de Kraai.
A crow having taken a piece of cheese out of a
cottage-window, flew 1) up into a high tree with
it, in order to eat it; which a fox observing,
came 2) and sat 3) underneath, and began
to compliment the crow upon the subject of her
beauty. .1 protest," says ho, • I never observed
it before, but your feathers are of a more deli-
cate white, than any that I ever saw 5) in my
life. Ah! what a fine shape and graceful turn of
body is there! And I make no question but you
have a tolerable voice. If it is but as fine as
your complexion, I don't 6) know a bird that
can pretend to stand in competition with you."
The crow, tickled with this very civil language,