Boekgegevens
Titel: Engelsch leesboek voor eerstbeginnende, benevens een woordenboekje
Auteur: Gedike, Friedrich; Bomhoff, Derk
Uitgave: Deventer: J. de Lange, 1840
5e verb. dr.
Opmerking: Vert. van: Englisches Lesebuch für Anfänger, nebst Wörterbuch und Sprachlehre. - 1795
Auteursrechten: Zie auteursrechten
Citeerinstructie: Bijzondere Collecties van de Universiteit van Amsterdam, UBM: Obr. 4085
URL: https://schoolmuseum.uba.uva.nl/bookid/LCSM_200628
Onderwerp: Taal- en letterkunde naar afzonderlijke talen: Engelse taalkunde
Trefwoord: Engels, Leermiddelen (vorm)
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   Engelsch leesboek voor eerstbeginnende, benevens een woordenboekje
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( 17. )
cage, picked up a guinea, and hopped away
with it. The miser missing the piece, observed
the felon hiding it in a crevice. » And art 2)
thou," cried he, »that worst of thieves, who hast
robbed nie of my gold, without the plea of ne-
cessity, and without regard to its proper use?
But thy life shall atone for so preposterous a vil-
lany." » Soft and fair, good master," quoth the
magpie. » Have I injured you more, than you
have injured the public? and am I not using
your money as you sourself do ? If I must loso
iny life for hiding a guinea, what do you de-
serve for hiding thousands?"
J) to sit. 2) to be.
40. Onderneeml niet te veel.
An eagle, from the top of a mountain, made
a stoop at a lamb, pounced it, and bore *) it
away to her young. A crow observing wliat
passed, was ambitious of performing the same
exploit; and darting from her nest, fixed her ta-
lons in the fleece of another lamb. But neither
able to move her prey, nor disentangle her feet,
she was taken by the shepherd, and carried home
for his children to play with; who eagerly in-
quiring Avhat bird it was: » An hour ago, said
lie, she fancied herself an eagle; she is now, I
suppose, convinced, that she is but a crow."
*) to bear, ^
41. De nil en de adelaar.
An owl sat 1) blinking in the trunk of a hol-
low tree, and arraigned the brightness ofthesun.
»What use for its beams, says she, but to dazzle
our eyes, so as not to see a mouse? For my
part, I am at a loss 2) to perceive, for what
purpose so glaring an object was created." —»Oh
fool! replies an eagle, to rail at excellencc which
2